9 Things We Can Do To Combat Racism…

Racism is alive and well in America and anyone who says otherwise is either crazy, delusional, or both.

11406778_10101450323352391_700167220161143589_n

Caption: Sending prayers up for the family, friends and loved ones of the 9 victims murdered in Charleston last night.

I was born and raised in the church. A.M.E. Zion as a little girl, and A.M.E. in High School. Who knows how often I was at bible study, choir rehearsal and worship service over the years.

Church is supposed to be the place where you go to lay your burdens down. It’s supposed to be sacred and safe. My heart aches to think that these nine people, in the midst of doing their father’s business, were violently taken away. They welcomed an outsider, a stranger, with open arms and the TERRORIST used a gun, given to him as a gift by his parents, to execute his white supremacist mission of murdering people for no other reason than the color of their skin.

I’m asking God to help me with this one… Help me to not be bitter. Help me to not hate the individual who perpetrated the crime. Tell me what to do and how to do it, as it relates to combating racism…

In honor of the nine lives that were lost… here are ten ways that we (regardless of race) can combat racism:

(1) Share stories, media pieces and news that combats racists stereotypes.

Racism feeds off of racists stereotypes including black people as lazy, ignorant, violent and sub-human. If you come across a story about a black person that combats those stereotypes, SHARE it via social media, in conversations and in professional settings.

(2) Stop saying that racism no longer exists. 

It’s offensive, it’s not true and it perpetuates the problem. Our society is not colorblind and the presence of a Black President does not mean racism just vanished with his election.

(3) Note your own biases and prejudices and intentionally fight against them.

You see a black man walking down the street and you have a thought to grab your purse tighter or walk on the opposite side of the street. Try NOT to clutch your purse tighter, stay on the same side of the street, make eye contact and offer to speak.

(4) Expose yourself, your family and your friends to black history and culture… and not just during Black History Month.

Watch a documentary about Black History, read about an important figure in black history, subscribe to a black publication like Essence or Ebony. If you have children, purchase a book by a black author that features black children. As Black Americans, we don’t have the option to NOT learn about mainstream culture and history. “Opt in” to learn more about the black experience.

(5) Hear all of the facts, before making a decision on a racial event or situation.

Don’t be so quick to dismiss something as an “overreaction” or an “emotional” response before getting the facts. Listen to a variety of perspectives (even those you disagree with) before deciding whether or not something was racist or prejudiced.

(6) Challenge racism when you see it.

Don’t be afraid to speak up and speak out, when you notice a racist act occur. Whether it’s in business, in a professional setting or in your personal life, if it makes you feel uncomfortable, speak up about it. Ask questions to black people you know, who may be able to offer some perspective.

(7) Do something.

Dialogue is the first step. We have to examine the legislation. We have to boycott and call people, companies and media sources out when racism rears it’s hideous head. Not everyone is going to protest in the streets, but you can support the efforts of those who are working on the ground financially and via advocacy.

(8) Help the next generation. 

It doesn’t take anything but time to invest in a young person. Take someone who is younger than you under your wing and mentor them. Bonus points if you reach out to someone who is racially or ethnically or socio-economically different from you.

(9) Vote.

Voting and being civically engaged is one course of action to take. When people commit hate crimes, they have to sit in front of judge. That judge is often selected based on appointment (from someone who was elected) or based on votes. We have to stop allowing others to make decisions for us when it comes to the discrepancies in sentencing, and the manner in which we are arrested, confined and tried. Even if you don’t think it matters, does it hurt to cast a vote?

My list is in no way exhaustive, but it’s just a few ways that you can get engaged if you’re angry, frustrated and desiring of something to do.

Leave a comment

Filed under Race, Reflection

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s